Places 

10 Groundbreaking Facts About Stonehenge

Situated in England, on the Salisbury Plain, 80 miles southwest of London, Stonehenge continues to puzzle all generations. The awe-inspiring structure with mythical origins still holds many mysteries, and it never seizes to fascinate both tourists and archeologists alike. The true purpose of the site still remains a mystery. But, nevertheless, we have learned something about it. Here are a some of the confirmed facts and theories about the mythical monument. Spoiler: They include both Charles Darwin and Merlin the Wizard. Stonehenge was built in phases. Archeological studies have shown…

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People 

10 Noteworthy Facts About Anne Boleyn

Her grandfather was a London hatter Anne Boleyn’s family originally settled in the village of Salle, in Norfolk. Her ancestors were peasants, but not of the very poor kind. On the contrary, they had enough money set aside. Anne’s great-great-grandfather, Geoffrey Boleyn, was in fact so sure of himself that he was accused of trespassing the royal property a multitude of times, taking grain and water supplies from their lord’s manor, without paying for them. He was also clever enough to set his younger son, also by the name of…

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War 

10 Most Decisive Battles of World War II

World War II was a global conflict. Nearly all of the countries supported either the Allies or the Axis. Also the battles took place on a large terrain and changed the global political situation irreversibly, leaving a trail of numerous deaths and significant damages behind. World War II was also one of the first conflicts making use of modern warfare, like weapons of mass destruction. However, some of the battles helped the Allies gain control over their common enemy and make sure that the authoritarian German rule has come to…

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Events 

10 Thought-Provoking Facts About the Emancipation Proclamation

1. It freed over 3 million people in one day. The Emancipation Proclamation was a presidential proclamation and an executive order, which means that is was both a document issued out of the President’s free will and a law in full force. With one single document, on January 1, 1863 the federal legal status of more than 3 million people changed in a day. All the formerly enslaved from the designated areas of the South were now officially free. In practice, anyone who managed to escape from the Confederate government…

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People 

5 Awesome Portuguese Explorers You Should Know

1. Ferdinand Magellan He was the first Portuguese explorer to set out on an expedition to the East Indies from 1519 to 1522, as well as the first one to circumnavigate the Earth. Born in 1480 and raised in a wealthy Portuguese family, he quickly became a skillful sailor and navigator. Soon, he was handpicked by King Charles I of Spain to lead the naval fleet in search of a westward passage to the Maluku Islands, also known as the Spice Islands. The fleet of five vessels sailed south through…

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Art 

10 Famous Paintings by Michelangelo Buonarotti

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was a famous painter living in the times of the Italian High Renaissance. He was a very talented artist, who mastered not only visual arts like paining and sculpture, but also other disciplines, such as architecture, poetry and engineering. His influence on the development of the classical European art was unprecedented. Alongside Leonardo da Vinci, he is considered to be one an archetype of a ‘man of Renaissance’, i.e. a person interested in every discipline which humankind pursues, following the Terence motto „Nothing of that…

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War 

5 Causes of the Crimean War

1. The Eastern Question This is an umbrella term used by historians to refer to all the weaknesses that the Ottoman Empire was dealing with after the Russo-Turkish War (1768–74), which ended in defeat for the Ottomans. What followed was a tremendous loss of power for Turkey on the European map, which marked the beginning of the end for the superpower. On the other hand, European empires such as Russia, Austria-Hungary and Great Britain benefited from it. They made a pact to protect their commercial and political interests. 2. Dispute…

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Places 

5 Amazing Facts About Angkor Wat

1. It is the biggest temple complex in the world. Angkor Wat, which translates literally as „temple city”. Built in the late 12th century by the Khmer King Suryavarman II, is actually not just one temple, but a collection of temples, spreading around a vast area of over 162.6 hectares (1,626,000 m2; 402 acres). Originally a Hindu site built to honor the god Vishnu, it then became a Buddhist religious landmark. Today Angkor Wat is the sole reason to visit Cambodia for over 50% of tourists coming here every year. It’s…

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10 Things Worth Knowing About Julius Caesar

He was born into one heck of a great family The gens Julia, Caesar’s house, were a patrician family with quite notable origins. The house claimed to have descended from Iulus, son of the legendary Trojan prince Aeneas, who according to myth might also have been the son of  Venus – Roman goddess of beauty and love. Historia Augusta, a late Roman collection of biographies, suggests that the name of the family stems from the fact that one of its predecessors was born by means of a ceserean section. Other explanations for the name include…

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Technology 

15 Inventions From Ancient Rome That Have Changed Our Lives for the Better

1. Aqueducts The aqueducts were constructed in order to conduct water from its original source to city’s households and fountains. The water found in nearby streams and rivers was not potable, due to its chemical and biological pollution. Therefore, an alternative had to be found and soon Appius Claudius Caecus found one. The first aqueducts ever constructed were were the Anio Vetus (272-269 BC), the Aqua Marcia (144-140 BC), and the Aqua Appia (312 BC) transporting water to a fountain at the city’s cattle market (clever economic thinking there). Today,…

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